Clinical Outcome

Clinical Outcome

Research Articles

Breast Cancer Survival at a Leading Cancer Centre in Malaysia

Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world, and a widening disparity has emerged between developed and developing countries. GLOBOCAN12 recently reported high cancer mortality in Malaysia, a developing country, suggesting its cancer health services is under-performing though there are likely individual centres of excellence such as the Subang Jaya Medical Centre, Malaysia (SJMC).

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Retrospective Analysis of Cancer Care Performance and Survival Outcome for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma at a leading Cancer Treatment Centre in Malaysia 2008-2012

This report focuses on a private medical centre cancer care performance as measured by patient survival outcome for up to 5 years. Methods: All patients with nasopharyngeal cancer treated at SJMC between 2008 and 2012 were enrolled for this observational cohort study. Mortality outcome was ascertained through record linkage with national death register, linkage with hospital registration system and finally through direct contact by phone

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SJMC’s healthcare performance measurement for breast cancer services

Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world, and a widening disparity has emerged between developed and developing countries. GLOBOCAN 2012 reported high cancer mortality in Malaysia, suggesting its cancer health services are under-performing though there are likely individual centres of excellence. This report focuses on Subang Jaya Medical Centre’s (SJMC) care performance as measured by breast cancer patient survival outcomes for up to five years.

The scourge of cancer

Thirty eight million people worldwide are killed due to noncommunicable diseases yearly, with cancers being the second most common cause of death (8.2 million). In 2012, there were 14.1 million new cases of cancer and 32.6 million people living with cancer within five years of diagnosis.

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Cancer survival: Life regained

The global action plan for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (Global NCD Action Plan) was adopted at the 66th World Health Assembly in May 2013, which included a set of nine voluntary global targets. The first of the nine targets that are to be attained by the year 2025 is to have a relative reduction of 25% in the overall mortality from cardiovascular disease, cancers, diabetes, or chronic respiratory diseases. Though modifying and avoiding key risk factors could prevent more than 30% of cancer deaths, mortality from cancer can be further reduced if cases are detected and treated early.

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Study shows SJMC Cancer and Radiosurgery Centre as world class

Patient survival outcome is a key measurement in determining the overall effectiveness of health services in the management of patients with cancer (healthcare performance).

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